WH: Tell me about Pokémon Go. What is happening on Pokémon Go?

It’s basically the first mainstream augmented reality program. It’s a game where the entire world is mapped and you walk around with the GPS on your phone. You walk around in the real world and can catch these little monsters and collect them. And everybody is playing it.

Does it tell you you’re here at San Vicente, close to Sunset Boulevard?

Yeah, it’s basically like a Google map.

But what does pokémon do at this corner here?

You might be able to catch some. It’s all completely virtual. It’s very simple, but it’s also an overlay of physically based information that now exists on top of the real world.

When two persons in search of a pokémon clash at the corner of Sunset and San Vicente is there violence? Is there murder?

They do fight, virtually.

Physically, do they fight?

No—

Do they bite each other’s hands? Do they punch each other?

Werner Herzog on Pokémon Go (The Verge)

This 11-mile stretch is one of the only places that defied the Army Corps’ Depression-era efforts at control. The bottom of the river was so soft that the concrete would not stick. As a result, this section of river is a purling, cobble- and rock-studded waterway with swimming mallards, blue herons, and cormorants atop boulders drying their outstretched wings. Both banks, though, form a massive concrete trough.

Still, nature finds a way. It turns out that water sheeting over the concrete grows algae that are an important foraging habitat for shorebirds. Indeed, on the day I visited, a black-necked stilt was working these hard bottom shallows.

[…] Historical ecology — the study of old photos, maps, and diary accounts — will provide a sense of what the river once looked like, including the wildlife and plant species present. This will help guide restoration. “It gives you a sense of options for the future,” Parker says.

Restoring LA’s river (Yale 360)

Blogging’s a lot of effort for scant reward, so if hardly anybody’s reading what you write, why bother? Alternative platforms have taken hold, and take far less effort to update, and get instant feedback. Self-broadcasting is no clique any more, it’s a universal collective, which leaves those of us who still create long-form prose down something of a cul-de-sac. Indeed images have already overtaken text for most, as people spend their days looking at photos of their mates, watching videos of comical kittens, capturing their food on Instagram, making conversation by appending snapshots from TV shows, and responding via emoji. Why bother writing anything, quite frankly, when nobody has time for anything more than swiftly digestible visual nuggets? […] Most importantly, new readers no longer come clicking via a long-standing blogroll in a sidebar. Instead they arrive via a one-off reference on social media, if they turn up at all, because Twitter and Facebook are very much in charge these days. A blog is now only as good as its last post, and long-term reputation counts for almost nothing. I’m very much aware that my daily readership is now almost exclusively people who arrived here once and stayed, and all too rarely fresh blood directed in from elsewhere.

Diamond Geezer

Loophole for All

The service of Loophole for All acquires the lists of companies incorporated in the offshore centers and armed with as little as a company name and a number, lets people hijack those companies and utilize them for public advantage.

This corporate identity theft benefits from the anonymous nature of those offshore companies. Everyone can pretend to be them because of their real owners’ secrecy. And even if it’s illegal to steal an identity of a company, the courts of offshoring centers don’t have any power or credibility onshore. And meanwhile, onshore authorities don’t have the resources to verify the real owners of companies offshore — even less to chase everybody down.

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